Breakout Session 1

Breakout Session 1

10:15 A.M. - 11:15 A.M.

1. Zines as Critical Praxis: Collapsing Discourse Around Who Owns Knowledge, and What It Means to be an Author

Madeline Veitch, Lydia Willoughby, (SUNY New Paltz)

This talk will explore how to engage campus community members in dialogue through the creation of zines - low budget, do-it-yourself texts that allow any reader to become an author and share their ideas through print media. Topics covered will include collaboration with faculty on zine-related assignments and extracurricular “compilation” zines as a tool to extend ongoing campus conversations and to connect library staff with each other. Participants will leave prepared to start planning for zine-related programing on their campus.

2. Digital Initiatives Bootcamp: Launching Digital Projects at Small Institutions with Limited Resources

Amy Bocko, (Emerson College)

Digital Initiatives Librarian Amy Bocko will share techniques, strategies and resources to launching a sustainable digitization program at small-scale institutions.

3. Weathering the Storm: Riding the Waves of an Evolving Profession in Turbulent Times

Jennifer Ditkoff, Elizabeth Dolinger, Patrick Hickey, Irene McGarrity (Keene State College)

Panel members discuss the reframing of library faculty roles at one public liberal arts institution after several years of teaching frustrating one-shots, trying to collaborate in a non-functional liaison model, and sitting at an antiquated reference desk. As the librarians adapt to changes in technology, information needs, and learning models, they aim to remain viable and maintain a sustainable workload while still feeling invigorated by the profession.

4. The emergence of the metadata cataloger: Are cataloging and metadata two separate fields?

Rachel Turner (Binghamton University)

How is the field of cataloging being reframed to keep up with 21st century trends focusing on metadata? Using the dataset for an in-process journal article, the interactions between the fields of metadata and cataloging are explored.

5. What’s in a Contract? Wordsmithing Service Agreements for Better Outcomes

Michael Rodriguez (University of Connecticut)

Reframing academic libraries requires contracts—for eresources but also for software, services, consortial memberships, and more. This workshop delivers a crash course in negotiating services and contracts favorable to your library.

6. Big Data, Ethics and the 21st Century Academic Librarian

Robert Berkman (University of Rochester)

Librarians should be leading their academic community’s discussions and practice on the ethical use of big data and data sets. This session will outline the key ethical issues when dealing with big data; identify librarians taking a leadership stance in their institution; and provide guidelines for providing data ethics literacy to patrons and stakeholders.